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Summer Week 3

Everything is due June 11th by 11:59.

Some of you have gotten a lot of things up and running and fixed by using the Digital Knowledge Center.  The University of Mary Washington’s Digital Knowledge Center provides peer tutoring to all University students on digital projects and assignments. Students can schedule 50 minute, one-one-one tutorials with a trained peer tutor on any DS106 related projects.  Click Here to set up an appointment.

Introduction to Audio

This week in ds106 we’re going to be diving into our first storytelling genre: audio. Working with sound can be a bit daunting and unfamiliar, so we’ll be easing you into it this week. Nearly all previous ds106 students start here dreading this media, and in a few weeks they totally change their mind.

We’ll ask you to do some listening exercises as well as do some audio story editing.


PART I:  About Audio Storytelling

Look, Listen and Watch below.  Pay attention and keep track of the “nuggest” that grabs your attention- and write a blog post summarizing what you learned about how these experts describe their craft. Come back to these later when you review some audio shows I recommend listening to.

For many of you radio may seem like old technology, but there is a lot of current powerful creativity done in a single media. Audio is most effective when sounds generate stories in the minds of listeners.  You might be familiar with the panic caused in the late 1930s when Orson Wells produced the radio show of H.G. Wells War of the Worlds– it was so effective, people thought it was real. If you think we are much more savvy in the modern age, read about what happened when producers of an Italian movie tried to play out a promotional video as something like looked like a real news broadcast.

I’d like you to listen to some experts on audio storytelling describe a bit of how this is effective, probably no one has their game on for this than Ira Glass, host of This American Life, a weekly radio storytelling show on National Public Radio.

Listen to least two parts of Ira Glass’ Series on storytelling (all together they’re about 20 minutes)

Find Part TwoPart ThreePart Four.

For another point of view, listen to a short interview with Radiolab‘s Jad Abumrad on “How Radio Creates Empathy”:

or listen to his longer talk where he shares how he and his colleagues go about the process of creating radio shows.

Jad Abumrad: Why “Gut Churn” Is an Essential Part of the Creative Process from 99Uon Vimeo.


PART II: Introduction to Audio Techniques

Some things to notice when listening to audio are the pacing (think of the equivalent of paragraphs in sound), the use of music, sound effects, ambient/environmental sounds, the introduction of radio “bumpers” to remind us of the show, introduction and exits. Of key importance is trying to hear the layering of sounds, of how audio can create a sense of place by being more than just a recording, but a deliberate stacking of audio.

For a great reference reference, you might listen to an episode of Howsound, the radio show that takes you behind the scenes to understand how these shows are produced- Dissecting Joanne Rosser, Papermaker.

As another example, we took out elements of an hour long episode of RadioLab, a 2007 show called Detective Stories, and uploaded a shorter version to Soundcloud, where the comments indicate how some of these are used in the show. See if you can pick these out in this example and then in other audio you listen to this unit.

Another technique that is counter-intuitive, is when sound is left out. Listen to this annotated clip, an intro to an episode of the TED Radio Hour, for what happens near the 3 minute mark when the background music suddenly stops

Here are some references for audio techniques:

View the story “ds106 Tips for Audio Storytelling” on Storify

And, if that is not enough, among the open participants of ds106 is Scottlo, a guru of audio and radio technique. Scott was one of several ds106ers who gathered in the summer of 2013 in Kamloops, British Colombia for SoundCamp, a one day hands on experience in learning audio recording and editing technique– check out the SoundCamp site for audio resources and tutorials.

Also useful from Scottlo are archives from his daily series from the Summer ds106 Zone class of 2013, below are some selected episodes where he reviews audio and shares Audacity tips:

Lo Down Episode 1
Lo Down Episode 8
Lo Down Episode 9
Lo Down Episode 10
Lo Down Episode 11
Lo Down Episode 12
Lo Down Episode 13
Lo Down Episode 14


Part III: Listening to Stories

listeningOne of the best ways to understand how audio can be used to create stories is to listen to some great examples. We’ve assembled a list of audio stories for you.

Overall, how effective do you think audio was for telling the story(ies)? What types of audio techniques did the producers use — sound effects, layering of sounds, music, etc. — to convey their story? While we are interested in reading what you thought of the story being told — but we’re just as interested in your reflection about HOW the story was told. Try and step back from the story itself, and reflect upon the technique that the storytelling/producers used. What choices did they make that impacted your understanding of and feelings about the story? What are the techniques from the references above that you may not have noticed before?

Pay very close attention to not only the stories told but how they are constructed in audio format. Take the time to focus on listening, not just in the background of being on your computer. Put the phone down, turn off the TV, tell the family to leave you alone. Just listen.

Listen to “Moon Graffiti” This is an excellent example of audio storytelling. Think about how the sounds, both the sound effects and the changes in sound, tell you what is going on, how they create a sense of place, a sense of space and a sense of atmosphere. We hear these same techniques used in film and video, where they are vitally important but often unnoticed. Consider what we watched, read and listened to this week and in the previous weeks. How does sound drive stories? How does it impact mood and create atmosphere? Write a blog post on your thoughts on audio storytelling. Use specific examples and embed them in your post. Tag the post audioreflection.


Part IV: Your First Audio Stories

Start your work on these assignments by reviewing this list of audio resources and/or the Audio Section of the ds106 Handbook section on Tools. You will find information here about software you can use to produce your own audio, as well as links to sites where you can download free clips, music, and sound effects.

  • We strongly recommend Audacity, a free and open source audio-editing program, further details below. If you have access to and experience with a different audio editing system, you are free to use it instead. Along with Audacity, you will need to download and install the LAME mp3 Encoder in order to save audio as .mp3 files.Download and Experiment with Audacity: Unless you have a lot of previous experience with audio editing, you should plan on spending some time this week getting comfortable with Audacity. It is recommended that you do this right away, because you will find that audio editing can be quite time-consuming. If you have another audio editing platform that you’re familiar with, you can skip this step. But everyone needs to get their hands dirty with audio editing. If you’re overwhelmed by Audacity, make an appointment with at the Digital Knowledge Center for help: http://dkc.umw.edu.

Complete 12 Stars of Audio Assignments: This week you must complete at least 12 stars of assignments from the Audio category in the Assignment Bank.

 Involve the character you created in at least one of the assignments in some way. One assignment everyone must do is the sound effects story (3 ½ stars): This is a challenge to tell a short story (no longer than 90 seconds) using nothing but sound effects! And make it something more interesting than waking up, taking a shower and eating breakfast. We highly recommend using http://freesound.org to find free sound effects for this project.

Make sure all your completed assignments are uploaded to SoundCloud, and write up a post for each assignment in which you embed that audio from SoundCloud. Note: If you use copyrighted content in your audio projects, the SoundCloud content police may block them. You can use CC Search to find content that you can safely use.

Share each of these contributions in separate posts on your blog, and tag them according to the instructions on their assignment page.


Part V: Weekly Summary

Your weekly summary is due by Sunday, June 11, 2017 at midnight. As always, link to or embed all of your work from the week. Use this as an opportunity to reflect upon your initial foray into audio. What did you struggle with? What ideas/exercises were most challenging or interesting?

Now we are moving into the main part of the course where the bulk of your work is writing up assignments, you are going to be expected to follow the criteria  – just posting “here is my assignment” is not going to be enough to earn credit. There needs to be writing with your media, a story about the story.

This week’s checklist includes:

  • Summarize the key points you learned about audio storytelling from the Ira Glass and Jad Abumrad videos.
  • Summarize TED Radio Hour and ScottLo.
  • Summary of the “Moon Graffiti” you listened to, making special notes of the techniques used. Be sure to link to the show you listened to.
  • Summarize/link the Audio assignments
  • Summarize/link At least 4 Daily Creates
  • Summary of your feedback from your Comments and what you gained by looking at other people’s blogs.  You must make at least 5 comments on other people’s blog, they must be different people.  It must be construct feedback not this is great.
  • At least a paragraph on what you learned this week, what questions/complaints you have.
  • Weekly Summary Every week, you will be required to submit a summary post by the weekly deadline (generally due on Sundays at midnight). These posts should include links to or embedded media from all the work you have done for the week: storytelling assignments, daily creates, reflections etc. In addition, you should use this post to reflect upon your activity of the week:
    • How well do you feel you completed the requirements of the week’s assignments?
    • What gave you trouble? What did you enjoy most? What did you learn?
    • What would you do differently? What questions to you have?
    • What are some of the larger issues surrounding your work? Cultural/Societal implications?

These weekly summaries are what we will use to find all of your weekly work as we determine your grade for that week. In addition, they are an opportunity for you tell us how you feel you are doing and what’s giving you trouble, overall, in the course. If you forget to include something in a weekly post, I may not realize you’ve completed it. If you fail to submit a weekly summary, you will get no grade for that week! By the way proper English and good writing are required!

These posts are REALLY important. I use them to grade you every week, so you need to link to other posts you’ve written, embed media you’ve created, and narrate the process of learning that you went through this week. What did you learn? What was harder than you thought it would be? What was easier? What drove you crazy? Why? What did you really enjoy? Why?Final Note: you MUST submit the link to this weekly post in Canvas by midnight on Sunday.  NO EXCEPTIONS. NO LATE WORK ACCEPTED.

Week 2: Where did the first week go?

  • All work is due by midnight on July 3rd, 2016.

The University of Mary Washington’s Digital Knowledge Center provides peer tutoring to all University students on digital projects and assignments. Students can schedule 50 minute, one-one-one tutorials with a trained peer tutor on any DS106 related projects.  Click Here to set up an appointment.

Week 2 will be focused on the design. For this week you will be ramping up your command of image editing as well as closely considering design elements such as color, font, iconography, etc. Additionally, you will be required to reflect on questions of copyright as it relates to creative works online.

General Design & DesignBlitz Resources

Below you will find a set of general design resources as well as brief descriptions and resources for several concepts of visual / graphic design (Typography, Color, Minimalism, Affordance, Balance, Proportion, Unity, etc) that you will be using in your DesignBlitz assignment. You should refer to and review the general resources as a way to familiarize yourself with concepts and approaches to design — they will prove helpful as you complete all your design work this week.

You should review the DesignBlitz concepts, specifically, to help you with that particular assignment. Your task is to get a basic understanding of these concepts, and spend this week searching for examples of them as you complete your DesignBlitz. Refer to this week’s assignment post for details about what you must do to complete the DesignBlitz.

NOTE: We’re not expecting you to read every article or watch/listen to every video or audio on this page. This is a resource list and you should refer to it, as needed, this week while you complete the design unit. We DO recommend that you spend some time reviewing at least some of the resources here because we think you will find them useful. 

General Design Resources

What is Design?

What exactly is design? It factors into almost every object or thing we see on a regular basis. It involves the planning of an object’s presentation so that it achieves its purpose, be it a advertisement for chewing gum or a door knob.  Is good design as noticeable as bad design?

We Are All Artists

Listen to Tim Owens ” We Are All Artists”  (MP3 file) as well as the list of sites below that he refers to in his talk. You may find several of these resources very useful to you as you complete your design assignments this week!

DesignBlitz Resources

Color

Color creates mood, draws attention to key elements. Good designs can use bold color or none at all (lack of color or monochrome makes a message too). What colors work well together? What methods of using color are more effective? What do saturate colors say as compared to pastels?

Resources

Typography “is the visual component of the written word” – It is the form in which text is displayed, and the characteristics of the type used- Is san serif always better? why or why not? What do aspects of font weight, style, spacing, kerning have to do with how a message is transmitted and received?

Resources

Metaphors & Symbols

What are best practices for using symbols to represent objects, things, ideas? What works? How can complex ideas be represented in symbols?

Resources:

Minimalism & Use of Space

How can designers do more with less? What makes elegant designs?

Form, Function, Message

How well does design convey its meaning or potential use or real world objects?

Resources

Balance

“Balance is an equilibrium that results from looking at images and judging them against our ideas of physical structure (such as mass, gravity or the sides of a page). It is the arrangement of the objects in a given design as it relates to their visual weight within a composition. Balance usually comes in two forms: symmetrical and asymmetrical.”

Principles of Design

The Everyone video Symmetry is a fantastic study on the ways things can display visual symmetry

Rhythm

“Rhythm is the repetition or alternation of elements, often with defined intervals between them. Rhythm can create a sense of movement, and can establish pattern and texture. There are many different kinds of rhythm, often defined by the feeling it evokes when looking at it.”

Proportion

“Proportion is the comparison of dimensions or distribution of forms. It is the relationship in scale between one element and another, or between a whole object and one of its parts. Differing proportions within a composition can relate to different kinds of balance or symmetry, and can help establish visual weight and depth. ”

Dominance

“Dominance relates to varying degrees of emphasis in design. It determines the visual weight of a composition, establishes space and perspective, and often resolves where the eye goes first when looking at a design.”

Unity

“The concept of unity describes the relationship between the individual parts and the whole of a composition. It investigates the aspects of a given design that are necessary to tie the composition together, to give it a sense of wholeness, or to break it apart and give it a sense of variety.”

What you need to do this week.

1. Read and Reflect on The Vignelli Canon: A design resource that’s worth looking at is The Vignelli Canon. It’s a short booklet by Massimo Vignelli, who was a superstar in the world of graphic design. The booklet is light on text and heavy on space and imagery, so it’s a quick read. His purpose in writing it was to share his knowledge for the benefit of other designers. As he says, “Creativity needs the support of knowledge to be able to perform at its best.”Vignelli did most of his work in the pre-Internet era, when graphic design meant ink on paper, so some of the information is not so relevant to our online environment, but the principles still stand. So take a look at it, and let us know what you think. Categorize your reflection post under Thoughts/Ideas and tag it “vignelli” (no quotes).

2. Complete a DesignBlitz: To reinforce your understanding, you need to undertake a “Design Blitz.” Carry your camera with you this week and take photos of objects, ads, signs, etc. that illustrate at least four of the ten concepts listed below (one photo per concept).   The concepts are discussed in length above but here is a list of the concepts.

    • Color
    • typography
    • metaphors/symbols
    • minimalism & use of space
    • form/function/message
    • balance
    • rhythm
    • proportion
    • dominance
    • unity
    • Share all your photos on Flickr and tag them designblitz; also make sure you write up a blog post sharing what you found and tag it “designblitz”.
    • When you have completed your Blitz, write a blog post that includes (THAT MEANS EMBED!) the photos and your analysis of the design elements and what makes them effective or not. (You should do this in one single post.)
    • PRO TIP: Sometimes we can learn just as much from badly designed things as we can from well-designed things!

3. Do your Daily Creates: 4 TDCs this week.

4. Complete five different design assignment of least 12 stars

  1. Complete five different design assignments of at least 12 stars of Design assignments from Assignment Bank.
  2. Everyone must complete Are We There Yet? Three Stars
    • Example Photos Not A Complete Blog Post

fourthreeone
two

3. A least one assignment you complete this week needs to be 4 stars or higher. It’s time to push yourself.

4. Each design assignment must be blogged and narrated with your process and thinking! Don’t forget to review Writing Up Assignments some of you have been very light on the write-ups, and that’s not a good thing.

5.  2 animated GIF assignments: Go to Animated Gif Assignment Bank . Pick two assignments, each assignment must be blogged and narrated with your process and thinking! Also, here’s a tutorial for creating GIFs using GIMP.

7. Weekly Summary Every week, you will be required to submit a summary post by the weekly deadline (generally due on Sundays at midnight). These posts should include links to or embedded media from all the work you have done for the week: storytelling assignments, daily creates, reflections etc. In addition, you should use this post to reflect upon your activity of the week:

  • How well do you feel you completed the requirements of the week’s assignments?
  • What gave you trouble? What did you enjoy most? What did you learn?
  • What would you do differently? What questions to you have?
  • What are some of the larger issues surrounding your work? Cultural/Societal implications?

These weekly summaries are what we will use to find all of your weekly work as we determine your grade for that week. In addition, they are an opportunity for you tell us how you feel you are doing and what’s giving you trouble, overall, in the course. If you forget to include something in a weekly post, we may not realize you’ve completed it. If you fail to submit a weekly summary, you will get no grade for that week! By the way proper English and good writing are required!

These posts are REALLY important. We use them to grade you every week, so you need to link to other posts you’ve written, embed media you’ve created, and narrate the process of learning that you went through this week. What did you learn? What was harder than you thought it would be? What was easier? What drove you crazy? Why? What did you really enjoy? Why?Final Note: you MUST submit the link to this weekly post in Canvas by midnight on Sunday.  NO EXCEPTIONS. NO LATE WORK ACCEPTED.

It Sounds Like Week 3

Everything is due June 5th by 11:59.

Some of you have gotten a lot of things up and running and fixed by using the Digital Knowledge Center.  The University of Mary Washington’s Digital Knowledge Center provides peer tutoring to all University students on digital projects and assignments. Students can schedule 50 minute, one-one-one tutorials with a trained peer tutor on any DS106 related projects.  Click Here to set up an appointment.

Introduction to Audio

This week in ds106 we’re going to be diving into our first storytelling genre: audio. Working with sound can be a bit daunting and unfamiliar, so we’ll be easing you into it this week. Nearly all previous ds106 students start here dreading this media, and in a few weeks they totally change their mind.

We’ll ask you to do some listening exercises as well as do some audio story editing.

Finish Reading: It Sounds Like Week 3

Week 2: It’s beginning to look like more work

  • All work is due by midnight on May 29, 2016.

The University of Mary Washington’s Digital Knowledge Center provides peer tutoring to all University students on digital projects and assignments. Students can schedule 50 minute, one-one-one tutorials with a trained peer tutor on any DS106 related projects.  Click Here to set up an appointment.

Week 2 will be focused on the design. For this week you will be ramping up your command of image editing as well as closely considering design elements such as color, font, iconography, etc. Additionally, you will be required to reflect on questions of copyright as it relates to creative works online.

Finish Reading: Week 2: It’s beginning to look like more work

Summer Week 1

Intro and Visual/Design

The University of Mary Washington’s Digital Knowledge Center provides peer tutoring to all University students on digital projects and assignments. Students can schedule 50 minute, one-one-one tutorials with a trained peer tutor on any DS106 related projects.  Click Here to set up an appointment.

Finish Reading: Summer Week 1

Week 13 & 14 I remixed a remix, it was back to normal.

I am going to use Jim Groom Lecture from 2012 for remix.  You need to really start listening around 3:30.  You will want to watch RiP: A Remix Manifesto first (given below).

For the next two weeks you’ll be exploring the culminating ideas of ds106–remixes and mashups– the artistic recasting of existing media into new forms by creative combination and editing. This will build off of your previous work in all media forms. And we will even remix our own assignments.

Finish Reading: Week 13 & 14 I remixed a remix, it was back to normal.

Week 10: Video Killed the Radio Star

The University of Mary Washington’s Digital Knowledge Center provides peer tutoring to all University students on digital projects and assignments. Students can schedule 50 minute, one-one-one tutorials with a trained peer tutor on any DS106 related projects.  Click Here to set up an appointment.

Finish Reading: Week 10: Video Killed the Radio Star

Week 9: Don’t believe anything you read on the net

Spider-web-1

Stories in/of the Web

All the work your groups have done the last two weeks pays off as your shows will be broadcast on ds106 radio Monday night this week. As the last part of our audio segment, your task this weel will be to evaluate the show from another team and also self-evaluate your own team’s show.

In addition, we move to a different kind of storytelling, one that uses the space of existing web sites as a place for you to assert your own stories into them.

Radio Shows Go Live

The recorded radio shows are done and now we will listen  which you all have had experience listening to back in week four.

Your final task will be to listen to the show from another group. You will then write a blog post in which you evaluate the show, offer advice, suggestions, or compliments (be sure to link to the show!). In addition, you will provide the same evaluation for your own show, after having completed the work and listened to other ones.

Show People Who Need To Review People Who Created the Show
Grumpy Desperados  Stephanie King  Andrew Boswell
 James Baylor  Miles Davis
 Benjamin Brady  Adam Hoff
 Ashlyn Runk  Sean Morris
 Jack Brooks  Kelsey Stanbro
Show People Who Need To Review People Who Created the Show
The Verge  Andrew Boswell  Stephanie King
 Justin Lawrence  Ashlyn Runk
 Mitchell Eubank  Emma Sax
 Miles Davis  Miranda Skinner
 Tori Lear  Amanda Wassenberg
Show People Who Need To Review People Who Created the Show
Digital Story Fellers  Adam Hoff  James Baylor
 Emma Sax  Jack Brooks
 Maryna Matorina  Justin Lawrence
 Chantel Moton  Caleb Snow
 Rachel Stanford  Christopher Zimmerman
Show People Who Need To Review People Who Created the Show
Wacky History  Sean Morris  Benjamin Brady
 Kelsey Stanbro  Mitchell Eubank
 Miranda Skinner  Tori Lear
 Amanda Wassenberg  Maryna Matorina
 Caleb Snow  Chantel Moton
 Christopher Zimmerman  Rachel Stanford

Some criteria you can use to do this includes:

  • Quality of audio sound -e.g. is the volume appropriate? are the levels even? Is the sound clear, and free of noises not needed (e.g. mouse clicks, background noise)?
  • Quality of audio editing – use of effects, transitions, are the edits clean?
  • Use of sound effects- how are they used? Is it effective?
  • Use of music- how is it used? Is it effective or distracting?
  • Does the show have a structure? Is it cohesive or does it feel stitched together?
  • Does it tell a story effectively? Is there a sense of drama, unknown? Does it draw you in to listen?
  • If you would rate this radio show, how many stars out of five would you give to the show

Remember to use this as well to self-evaluate your own team’s show.

Telling Stories Within The Web

This might be a subtle distinction, but so far you have been using media (so far images, design, and audio) to create stories in the web spaces you publish to- this is writing stories ON the web. In this week, we play with this idea in a way, in that you will be asked to use the affordances of other web sites to change their intent, meaning, or purpose to tell a story in those spaces.

This Web Storytelling idea was first done in ds106 in the Spring of 2011 where the description for what we are asking you to do is

Over the next week we’ll be playing with storytelling within the web. What does this mean? Well, Martha Burtis lays out the idea nicely in this post here about the idea behind this assignment (read it!), but to briefly summarize: you will be intervening in the code and design of a website of your choice to tell a story. You are not to photoshop the design of the site (if you can), but rather intervene in the actual html and CSS of the site—though you can photoshop particular images on the site.

Perhaps the most well known examples take place on Amazon pages such as The Mountain Three Wolf Moon Short Sleeve Tee where people have intervened just in the product comments to make this ordinary t-shirt have magical powers. It becomes a way of making a political statement as read in the comments of a children’s aircraft toy (hat tip to @bellekid). Or read how Phillippe Dubost’s resume modded to look like an Amazon product worked out pretty good for him. See more examples of Amazon Funniest Product Reviews – these are all ways in which an ordinary web page is fictionalized in a creative way simply through comments.

You are not being asked to code web pages; but we have tools that you can use in a web browser to modify the content of an existing web page, change the text, images, and links, so that it has different content and meaning. Some examples by previous ds106 students include:

The story creation part means finding an existing web page to work with as raw material -good candidates are newspaper stories, product entries in sites like Amazon or eBay, movie/book reviews — in fact, simpler pages like a search result or Craigslist are easier to work with.

The tools you can use allow you to, in a web browser, actually modify the content. The trick is then to save it as a raw HTML web page, and upload it to your own web directory (this means returning to your UMW Domains control panel to upload files to your site). The end goal is to have both a screen shot image and an real working web page you created.

Here are a few approaches you can take for this project:

X-Ray Goggles

Mozilla X-Ray Googles tool is is meant to help you see (like an x-ray) how web content is structured:

X-Ray Goggles allow you to see the building blocks that make up websites on the internet. Activate the goggles to inspect the code behind any webpage, then remix elements with a single click, swapping in your own text, images and more.

What you should do is review the X-Ray Googles instructions and install the tool in your browser bar. (this will work in any modern web browser). This can be invoked directly on any web page you want to explore and change Goggles provides an overlay interface to change text, formatting, even images — essentially to rewrite any web page.

When you are done, you’ll need to save your changed code – click “P” in the bottom left when the X-Ray Googles are activated. The easy way is to publish it on the Hackasaurus site, from which you will get a URL, but if you want to go extra geeky, you can save the code and make it a page in your own site (this is by no means necessary).

  1. When you hit Publish in Hackasuarus, use the option to “download” your code which gives a display of HTML code. Copy that in its entirety.
  2. On your computer, open up the app that is a plain text editor- in Windows this is NotePad, on the Mac it is Text Edit. DO NOT USE MS WORD. DO NOT USE MS WORD. Did we say DO NOT USE MS WORD. IT WILL RUIN YOUR PROJECT!
  3. Paste all the stuff you copied.
  4. If you are using TextEdit on the Mac, Select “Make Plain Text” from the Format menu.
  5. Save it as a file that ends in .txt
  6. From your desktop, change the file name so its extension is “.html”
  7. Open this file (it should appear in your web browser)and make sure it looks like the page you redesigned. You may get weird warnings for things like flash, etc. Ignore them.
  8. Start editing your blog post. Click the “add media” button (It is one of the icons just above the editing tools, towards the left side.
  9. Upload the html file
  10. Edit the “title” field to be the text you want to make hyperlinked
  11. Make sure you use the option nest to Link URL for “File URL” This is the web address of your new page.
  12. Click insert

And now you have a link to a standalone web page on your own site.

Your work then is to do one Storytelling Within the Web assignment – write a blog post with the usual writeup components, and include both a screen shot of your reworked page and a link to a live web version of your retold web story page. This is a five star assignment.

Raw Code

If you are down and dirty with web code, you can save the raw source of a web page and reconstruct the content in HTML. This approach is not for the faint of hear! We recommend taking it ONLY if you have some experience with writing/editing HTML.

More Web Storytelling

We have a few more of these kinds of activities in the ds106 Web Assignments section – your task is to do 2 assignment worth at least 6 stars.

Daily Creates

You should be very deft now at doing the Daily Create assignments, so we are going to ask that you add a new component this week. You are to do at least four Daily Creates this week. When you have completed your four, look at them and find a way to connect them in a story. Re-edit your captions of your flickr photos, you tube videos, and soundcloud recordings so that there is a narrative that uses the media AND links them (via a hyperlink) between these media.

So your story might start with a flickr image, then link to a YouTube video, and then link back to another flickr image. The idea here is to construct a story that jumps across these media sites in a way that works as a single story.

Weekly Summary

Your weekly summary and personal reflection post is due by midnight on Sunday, October 25. Your post should include the following:

  • Evaluation of the other radio show you are assigned to review, as well as one for your own group.
  • Complete the Storytelling within the Web assignment
  • Complete 2 assignment worth at least 6 stars Web Assignments (other than the storytelling within the web one).
  • Complete 4 daily creates and connect them as one web based story.

Week 7 & 8 “Video Killed the Radio Star”

Audio and the Big Radio Show

radio_radio_logoWelcome to Weeks Seven & Eight of ds106. Somewhere in here is official half-way point for the class. Congratulations, you’re half-way to reclaiming your life again!   All work is to be summarized, except the radio show, in a single blog post for this stretch due midnight October 18th.

Its in your own and your groups interest to not let the work slide until the end (c.f.Recipe for Disaster) Finish Reading: Week 7 & 8 “Video Killed the Radio Star”

Week 6 “If you can dream it, you can do it.” Walt Disney

The University of Mary Washington’s Digital Knowledge Center provides peer tutoring to all University students on digital projects and assignments. Students can schedule 50 minute, one-one-one tutorials with a trained peer tutor on any DS106 related projects.  Click Here to set up an appointment.

If you can dream it, you can do it.” Walt Disney

Finish Reading: Week 6 “If you can dream it, you can do it.” Walt Disney